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    Almost 13 Movies Directed by John Carpenter

    Few filmmakers are as prolific, consistent, and creative as John Carpenter. The man directed many of the most famous and popular films of the 80s, including horror masterpieces thing And the foga sci-fi cult sensation Escape from New YorkClassic, poignant action comedy Big problem in little China. Perhaps most famously of all, Carpenter gave the world the original Halloweenwhich both launched a long-running franchise that continues to accumulate sequels to this day, And A whole cycle of slasher films created in her image began. But what about Carpenter’s films he did not do Make?


    In addition to the 21 films he’s directed to date, Carpenter, like many of his contemporaries, has a slew of unmade projects, as well as a slew of films he intended to direct but didn’t. The main reason for this is that while his films are considered staple classics now, they weren’t always that way. Over the years, Carpenter has made many films that weren’t successful on their initial release. Until its famous 1982 remake thing It was a box office bomb that didn’t get the recognition it deserved until years later. Because of this, many of the projects he developed will either be handed over to other managers or will be postponed indefinitely. In the following list, we’ll count down the 13 movies Carpenter almost made, and explain why he ultimately didn’t.

    13 Firestarter (1984)

    Firester with young Drew Barrymore
    Universal Pictures

    fire starter, the 1984 film based on the Stephen King novel of the same name, was almost directed by Carpenter. The film is about a young girl, played by Drew Barrymore in one of the earliest and best horror roles, who develops the ability to set fires with her mind, and a mysterious government agency trying to control her. Although Carpenter was involved in pre-production on the film, he was replaced by director Mark L. Lester when thing He was It was released to meager earnings at the box office. Fortunately for fans of King and Carpenter, Carpenter has been adapting King’s novel Christine in a movie shortly thereafter.

    12 The Philadelphia Experiment (1984)

    Philadelphia experience
    New World Pictures

    Philadelphia experience is a sci-fi thriller about a World War II naval experiment that goes wrong and sends two sailors back to 1984. The fun and thought-provoking script was mostly written by Carpenter, until it got to the third act, which he couldn’t make up his mind how to end. In the end, the project was taken from him and rewritten upwards of nine times, before he finally fell into the lap of director Stuart Ravel.

    11 Godzilla

    Godzilla vs. Destoroyah
    Toho

    John Carpenter is the self-proclaimed Godzilla fanatic. Having loved the giant monster series since his early childhood, he directed A.J Godzilla The movie was going to be a dream come true for the horror master. a Godzilla A project with his name attached never took off, however, in recent years, Carpenter seems less than enthusiastic about the idea of ​​any American director touching the Japanese monster icon. As Carpenter himself said in an interview with Den of Geek, “American Godzilla Films is a computer festival. They lack charm, and I’m not interested.” Reading this and knowing Carpenter’s penchant for first-rate practical effects, it’s safe to assume that king He got the chance to direct A.J Godzilla Flick, it wasn’t going to be your usual “computer fest”. Alas, lovers of both Godzilla And Carpenter will only have to hope he hosts another kaiju movie marathon like he did in November 2022.

    Related: How the Godzilla franchise has stood the test of time

    10 Ninja

    American Ninja Movie
    Canon Film Distributors

    In the early 1980s, Carpenter had a number of exciting projects in development. One such project was an adaptation of Eric Van Lostbader’s vengeful martial arts novel, Ninja. I handed him over after The empire strikes back Director Irvin Kirshner proved to be the wrong choice, Carpenter wrote a new draft of the screenplay with frequent collaborator Tommy Lee Wallace. While it was certainly a classic action movie, the studio deemed its script unfilmable, and the project fell into “development hell.”

    9 Santa Claus: The Movie (1985)

    Santa Claus movie
    Tristar Pictures

    Santa Claus: The Movie, a poorly received 1985 fantasy holiday extravaganza, was originally set by Carpenter. The film is about the origin of Santa Claus and the conflict between the good-natured inhabitants of the North Pole and the devious businessmen of New York City. Carpenter allegedly hated the script and wanted to completely rewrite it, as well as compose the score himself, but the producers were only interested in making it live. They eventually passed on Carpenter and went with him The second jaws director, Jano Szwarc, to mixed results.

    Related: What are the best and worst Christmas movies of all time?

    8 Top Gun (1986)

    Top Gun - Maverick -1
    Paramount Pictures

    Yes, those classic high-octane, super-powered ’80s The best At one point, she was offered to direct by Mr. Carpenter. The movie, about elite pilots during the Cold War, didn’t sit well with Carpenter. He turned down the offer in part because of concerns about the realistic depiction of the armed conflict with the Soviet Union during the Cold War—which he thought might make international relations worse—and also because he personally did not think it was the right choice for the film. The movie was eventually directed by the great Tony Scott, who obviously was right choice, as the film remains an iconic classic more than three decades later.

    7 The Golden Child (1986)

    Eddie Murphy 1986
    Paramount Pictures

    golden child is a comedy staple Eddie Murphy once had in Carpenter’s hands. The film is about a mystical Tibetan child who is kidnapped and must be rescued by a cynical Los Angeles social worker. Its mixture of comedy, action, and Asian mysticism appealed to Carpenter, but he eventually backed out, opting instead to direct the similar theme. Big problem in little China. golden child Eventually I found management in shape candidate Director Michael Ritchie.

    Related: 12 Eddie Murphy Movies We Couldn’t Live Without

    6 Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers (1988)

    Halloween 4 Michael Myers
    Trancas International

    Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers It marked the glorious return of empty-faced killer Michael Myers to movie theaters after a misunderstanding Halloween III: Season of the Witch, in which a new villain appeared. While the film was in the early stages of development, producers approached Carpenter to direct, hoping for another simple, effective slasher similar to the first film in the series. Carpenter commissioned a script that was more complex than the producers had in mind, and when it was rejected, Carpenter walked away from the project. in the end, Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers Directed by Dwight H Little.

    5 shadow company

    Shane Black in Predator
    Twentieth Century Fox

    shadow company It is a text written by lethal Weapon Writer Shane Black, an action horror story about a squad of American soldiers who died in Vietnam coming back to life to torment the people of their hometown. According to Death Birth Movies described by BlackBerry shadow company It is an intersection between detachment And The ExorcistThe film was intended to be Carpenter’s blockbuster comeback after its “box office failure.” Big problem in little China. Unfortunately, the project never came to fruition, leaving Carpenter fans forever curious about what the ghostly, blood-soaked action movie might look like.

    4 The Exorcist III (1990)

    The Exorcist III
    Twentieth Century Fox

    At one point in the late 1980s, so was Carpenter Exorcist Novelist William Peter Blatty’s first choice to direct The Exorcist III. However, over the course of the film’s development, the duo fell out over where to take the story, and Carpenter eventually left the project. Luckily Exorcist Fans, Blatty stepped up and directed the movie himself, which ends up being an exceptionally good horror movie that lives up to the original classic.

    3 Creature from the Black Lagoon

    Creature from the Black Lagoon
    Universal Pictures

    In the early 1990s, Carpenter intended his next project to be a facsimile of Creature from the Black Lagoon. The movie would have featured makeup and practical effects by the amazing Rick Baker, and would certainly have gone down in the history books as one of the best remakes of the 1950s creature (next to Carpenter’s earlier) thing). Unfortunately, many pre-production issues and delays were overcome, and the new version never got off the ground.

    2 Escape from Mars

    Mars ghosts
    Sony Pictures launch

    Carpenter had once planned sequels to his films Escape from New York And Escape from Los Angeles Worthy Escape from Marsbut the studio got cold about making another Snake Plissken movie when Escape from Los Angeles It led to meager returns at the box office. as a result of, Escape from Mars It became the Ice Cube Mars ghosts.

    1 Halloween H20: 20 Years Later (1998)

    Michael Myers in Hall of Mirrors with a knife at Halloween H20
    Dimension movies

    Halloween H20: 20 years later It was originally planned as a reunion of all of the cast and crew from the 1978 original, specifically bringing star Jamie Lee Curtis and director Carpenter together. The movie is about Michael Myers finding Laurie Strode after 20 years and wreaking havoc on her new sleepy community. Carpenter agreed to direct the film, but on terms that included a hefty $10 million starting fee. The producers denied Carpenter his fee, and management was given to seasoned veteran Steve Miner, who did a great job and made H20 One of the strongest entries in the franchise.

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